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of the deloitte cfo service. they were asked what their views are on the current operating environment. joining us with more, chief economist at deloitte. good to see you. i suppose we had a record second quarter of declines. >> confidence went through the floor back in june on the result of what's going on in the euro area. you've seen a bit of a bounce. risk appetite up is bit so i think cfos are looking at the same things the equity markets are looking at, qe-3 in the states, ecb bond buying. but the interesting thing is the underlying stock support is getting rather more defensive, they're more focused on cash. if respect. >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence?f re >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence?espe >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence?ct. >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence?. >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence? >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence? >> a lot of concerns relate to things outside the uk, in particular the weakness of the euro area, uncertainty. so there are things
with the fact that we're in, to put it lightly, a highly unusual climate and environment right now with long-term interest rates being held at 0% for quite some time. >> well, one of the ironies and one of the sad elements of glad path and target date strategies today is they are pushing people more and more heavily into bond at a time when bond yields with more negative. you're not making money, you're losing money by investing more and more in bonds. so we wind up becoming enablers of bad behavior in washington and supporters of that bad behavior by buying more and more of the bond when yields are negative. >> bob, have you a wonderful reputation and a great record built around the idea that you turn conventional wisdom inside out, whether it's fundamental indexing or this assault on the conventional thinking in target date funds. but i wonder what the real risk to the fund business is if these target date funds -- which certainly imply that you're going to have a set amount of money on a certain date. what if they don't work out and what should the assumptions be if i'm an investor on wha
the federal government take advantage of the low interest rate environment and issue $500 billion in 30-year bonds to fix the nation's infrastructure. believe me, the market would lap it up. fifth, i would slap tariffs on good made by countries that pollute when they make those countries. that would stop the endless parade of jobs migrating from our country to other countries that don't. they have a ridiculous competitive advantage over us. six, i would insist there be a course in high school called money where kids could learn what money is, how to save, how to invest. if people have financial literacy, they would be going to the stock market and they could learn to speculate wisely, perhaps to find their own therapeutics. seventh, i would appoint a steven jobs memorial competitiveness czar to figure out how our businesses could be made more competitive and find out what they need in order to hire and expand, not government handouts but perhaps trying to get educated engineers trying to help these companies. i would reappoint ben bernanke as chairman of the federal reserve. if it weren't fo
stocks keep making all-time highs in this environment? >> with us today are sam stovall and our own bob pisani. sam, it's going to come down to earnin earnings, right, which starts tomorrow? >> tomorrow. the bar is not just set low, it's set below, under water. >> below dirt. >> off the lows. capital iq is forecasting a 1.3% deline. it was down to 1.8%. big deal. i think some of the numbers underneath are a little more telling, such as right now the early beat ratio at 58% is below the average of 62%. in terms of guidance, those that are guiding negatively are 3.3 to 1 for those guiding positively. >> that sounds very negative for the stock market. >> well, i think it's baked in right now, or a lot of that is probably baked in. the real question is, whether we're likely to be seeing qe3 as the trough -- >> how can it be baked in if we're sitting at 4 1/2 year highs? how is that baked in? >> exactly. >> i think nothing is really new. what has come out yet that's going to tell us things are a lot worse than we anticipated? materials are expected to show 20% earnings decline. energy down 1
that sports a yield, exactly the kind of dividend stock you want in this low interest rate environment. it's rallied since the beginning of the year, but lately it's pulled back three points. it could be giving you a good entry point here. first though, before making any decisions let's take a closer look with the chairman and co-ceo of prologis. brand new guest, brand new name. welcome to "mad money." >> nice to meet you. >> first, you just have the biggest building portfolio i've ever seen. it's global, right? just giant. >> it is pretty big and it's pretty good, which is more important, right? >> the reason i asked, normally i like to have real estate investor guys on because they know the tenor of the united states but you have huge exposure. in your most recent conference call you actually talk about -- what it's like in japan, china, brazil, canada. mexico. and these are doing very well. >> they are indeed. we're in 21 countries and with the exception of a few countries in europe, the rest of the world is actually doing pretty well. including some of the places in europe and northern
is discourage the move toward electric cars by trying to alleviate our concerns about the environment. they showed us their new $4 million experimental combustion engine, which they hope will increase gas mileage while it lowers co2 emissions. >> what we want to see is that there is an emphasis on also making this oil greener and making the fossil fuels in general greener, because they're gonna be with us for the long haul. >> let me be blunt, okay? and ask you to be candid. is it aramco's hope to prevent a switch away from oil? somebody said the country is the oil business. i mean, you absolutely need to do this for your own survival. >> and what's wrong with that? >> well, i didn't say anything was wrong with it, but it's a fact. you'd admit it's a fact. >> yeah, we admit a fact that, yes, this is--we depend on the oil industry. we want it to help us, you know, to develop our economy and to develop the economy of the world. so what is good for the well-being of saudi arabia should be good for the well-being of the world too. so there's nothing wrong with that. >> and so what do you
earnings are not correlated with the macro environment. ubs writes that alexion is a significant double-digit growth driver but uses the orphan drug model where pricing and reimbursement are insulated, the biotech is up a whopping 400% over the past three years. keep in mind this is a speculative takeout target. another standout stock, gilead sciences is up 70% year-to-date, ubs has it as its top large tech biotech pick, it's attractively trading to a discount to the biotech sector, biogen up 50% in the past year thanks to its strong earnings performance and anticipation riding behind its multiple sclerosis drug bg12 which could get approval by year's end. another is buyout speculation. the firms are on the hunt for under the radar biotech firms, bristol-myers among others making big bets. andrew you've been following that as well. >> thank you for that report. lot of beta. see if there's any alpha. >>> in the next hour of "squawk box" former ubs american chairman robert wolf will join us to talk financials, jobs and the election, mr. obama's favorite banker. and later health care, a ma
to talk about the idea that government should be smaller and get out of the way. and an environment that is favorable for business is actually an environment where business will create jobs. how that's going to go over? >> it won't go over well, he hasn't had a real plan so far. these are about real people's lives. he's got a tougher job i think than the president tonight. because most people because of his comments whether he realizes it or not, he's lived a privileged life. and he doesn't understand common workers, what we go through every day. so he's got a tough job to make people let them know that he does understand what they go through. if he can do that, he'll have a good night. if he can't, i don't think the zingers are going to matter. because big problems require big solutions not bumper sticker answers. >> of course we know the relationship between white house and labor has not always been rosy over the last four years. is there something the president also needs to say to impress you? >> again, it's not what he says to me but what really american workers need. and that'
to adjust to a slower growth environment. we've seen much lower inventory levels. we've seen underinvest inspemen capital, which is creating a bit of tail wind going into next year. interestingly enough, asia is in the same state. what is worrisome is companies haven't adjusted to the possibility of slower growth next year. >> peter, what are you looking for next week? what should we be watching for? >> i think the next three weeks is solely earnings. for two months we've had central banks putting goggles on our eyes. now the fundamentals can't be ignored anymore. they're out from under the rug. we get to hear what the guidance is going forward. >> so peter, on tuesday we're going to see angela merkel in greece. there's going to be horrendous protests, tear gas. we can just imagine. yet, we're going to be able to look through that and focus on the domestic earnings front here? >> the greek stock market was up 12% this week. the bond that's maturing at 11 years is at a high. i think everyone's beginning to it realize that greece is going to be given some slack because there's no other cho
but just the significance of it, the regulatory environment, all of those things came together in a way that maybe she just couldn't foresee. >> susan, thanks for joining us. it is a good read. enjoyed it very much. >> appreciate you having me here. >> great interview there, sue. >>> sprint customers can now pick their own vanity phone number. i'm not kidding. the idea is simple. instead of a ten-digit number you just dial "power lunch" instead. call me. don't go away. ♪ [ piano ] you. we know you. we know you're not always on top of it. and how could you be? that often you just want... quiet. we know all that life demands from you. and how it's almost impossible for you to escape. almost. introducing a car made better for you in every way. the luxurious, all-new honda accord. it starts with you. >>> time for the power rundown. kayla tausche and bob pisani is with me as well. china, those tensions we mention seem to be deepening. nation, now friend or foe to the u.s. and its investors? what do you think, kayla? >> i learned last week that china apparently funds pbs so i'm inclined to
that support such a move? >> think the baseline for us is essentially more of the same, but in an environment in which earnings are still pretty good and interest rates are still very, very low. i think the baseline forecast does support higher equity prices from here. i do think it's quite bimobile. i think that the alternative scenario to the baseline is one that's significantly worse because we do get a much bigger hit from the fiscal side, but on the baseline, it's supportive. >> i'm really quite confused here and the economy created 114,000 jobs and there's so much noise about the various aspects of the survey. and i'm not sure. 114,000 jobs create side bad, isn't it? that's very, very disappointing. >> it's lackluster, i would say. >> don't we have to -- typically say we have to generate 200,000 to deal what's happening with the population. isn't that usually where we are? why are we not there today? >> to keep the unemployment rate stable you need about $100 and the participation doesn't change. anything over 100,000 will push it over time. under 14 it would be extremely slowly so that
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)